Skip to main content »

Netizens slam Lonely Planet for stating Chinese built Banaue Rice Terraces and not by Igorot People

 |  2 min read

Lonely Planet says Banaue Rice Terraces were "first built around 2,000 years ago by the Chinese." Netizens were quick to correct the claim.

via igorotage.com

A new video published by Lonely Planet, a popular travel guide book publisher is being criticized heavily by Filipino netizens after stating that the Banaue Rice Terraces were built by the Chinese some 2000 years ago. 

From the video, it was noted that the rice terraces were "first built around 2,000 years ago by the Chinese."

A screenshot of the video at 0.50 timestamp clearly shows the texts over the video that says "These mud-walled rice terraces were first built around 2,000 years ago by the Chinese."

Many netizens who have watched the video were quick to correct the erroneous description and some expressed their disapointments. 

"The Banaue Rice Terraces was built by the Filipino natives, particularly Igorots. China did not invade Philippines in the past nor did they build any infrastructures in our country. Until recently," one Facebook user commented. 

Banaue Rice Terraces - Stairway to Heaven
Banaue Rice Terraces - Stairway to Heaven

The video was later taken down but, Lonely Planet, as it turns out, has been consistent in the claim. On its website, it says of the rice terraces:

"World Heritage listed, they're impressive not only for their chiselled beauty but because they were introduced around 2000 years ago by the Chinese.".

According to the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the terraces are an "outstanding example of an evolved, living cultural landscape that can be traced as far back as two millennia ago in the pre-colonial Philippines."

"They are all the product of the Ifugao ethnic group, a minority community that has occupied these mountains for thousands of years," the organization notes on its website.

"The Ifugao Rice Terraces are the priceless contribution of Philippine ancestors to humanity. Built 2000 years ago and passed on from generation to generation, the Ifugao Rice Terraces represent an enduring illustration of an ancient civilization that surpassed various challenges and setbacks posed by modernization," UNESCO further noted.

The terraces are believed to be 2,000 years old and had been built by the Igorot people living in the area.


Simple nga igorot


BanaueRiceTerraces Ifugao LonelyPlanet

Sharing is caring, kailian!

We do hope you find something great in this story. If you find this helpful, please do share it with the people you care about.


Igorotage is a social networking site — all contents are user-generated. The author's views are entirely his or her own and may not reflect the views of Igorotage.

Except as otherwise noted, the content of this page is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Join the discussion

Sign in to share your thoughts. No account yet?

What to learn next?

You might also like to read these related articles.

Ifugao Rice Terraces: The 8th wonder of the world

The rice terraces of Ifugao symbolize not only industry and engineering and aesthetic skills but also love of freedom and respect for fellowmen.

Brando in Travel

Oct 6, 2017 · 4 min read

106-year-old Igorot from Ifugao is Oldest COVID-19 Survivor

106-year-old Igorot centenarian from Ifugao and a resident of Baguio City is the oldest COVID-19 survivor in the country.

Broderick in General

Oct 20 · 2 min read

Ruben Buyucan Guinolbay: Igorot from Ifugao; Hero of Lamitan; Medal of Valor Nominee

Ruben Buyucan Guinolbay, an Igorot from Ifugao is one of the most decorated Scout Ranger in the country. Hero of Lamitan. Medal of Valor Nominee.

Brando in People

Oct 17, 2017 · 6 min read

Ifugao in a Nutshell; The descendants of Kabunyan

According to their oral tradition embodied in their myths, the Ifugao people are descendants of the deity, Kabunyan.

Brando in People

Dec 8, 2017 · 5 min read

Oral Literature of the Tuwali Ifugao in Kiangan

The oral literature of the Tuwali Ifugao in Kiangan has been classified into four types with three of the types having sub-types.

Brando in Culture

Feb 24, 2018 · 4 min read

Oldest Woman in Ifugao Still Reads the Bible Without the Need for Eyeglasses

Bugan Datong, the oldest woman in Ifugao Province still reads the Bible even without the help of eyeglasses. She shares her secrets to a long life.

Aira Jane Abuan in People

Apr 11, 2019 · 3 min read

Dawat di Bagol: A lost Ifugao Mumbaki Ritual

Dawat di Bagol is an elaborate ritual in elevating a mumbaki to a higher order called a mumbagol, a performer of the high prestige rituals in Ifugao.

Drew in Culture

Apr 22, 2019 · 4 min read

The Bulul: The Ifugao people's rice god or guardian spirit

The Bulul is not a souvenir item. It is an Ifugao anthropomorphic carving that symbolizes an Ifugao rice god or guardian spirits.

Drew in Culture

Apr 22, 2019 · 2 min read

The Ifugao Baki and Mumbaki

ONE thing that can be considered patently Cordilleran, particularly of the Ifugaos, is the baki.

Ariel in People

May 23, 2019 · 4 min read

Ifugao Grad Ranks 7th in Criminology Licensure Exams

A graduate from the Ifugao State University was among the topnotchers in the November 2019 Criminology Licensure Examinations.

Bong in People

Jan 9 · 1 min read